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04/04/2012

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Arthur Goldwag

I knew Bob well, back when he freelanced at Random House and then at the New York Review of Books (he helped me get a job there). Thank you for bringing him back so vividly.

S Savage

I too found that obit a few years ago and was deeply saddened by Bob's early demise. We dated briefly in 1984. A smart, funny, unpretentious, shy and sweet man. I very much enjoyed reading the Mad and Extraordinary Bob Tashman. Thank you for posting.

Tom Nissley

Thank you both for stopping by--I'm glad others remember him as I did.

Larry Jarvik

Thank you for sharing your memories of Bob Tashman!

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Fortnightly Firmament #14: Writers Facing Death

  • 1. Jonathan Swift on the death of Mrs. Johnson
  • 2. Stieg Larsson at 22
  • 3. Thomas Bernhard's anti-Austrian will
  • 4. Beth Alcott's mist floats away
  • 5. David Rakoff's last dance
  • 6. Irene Nemirovsky's raft in an ocean of leaves
  • 7. Michel de Montaigne's other half
  • 8. Sigmund Freud's last reading
  • 9. Christopher Hitchens's hospital library
  • 10. Margaret Wise Brown's final kick
  • 11. Heinrich von Kleist's joyous pact
  • 12. William James's goodbye to his father

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Fortnightly Firmament #14: Writers Facing Death

  • 1. Jonathan Swift on the death of Mrs. Johnson
  • 2. Stieg Larsson at 22
  • 3. Thomas Bernhard's anti-Austrian will
  • 4. Beth Alcott's mist floats away
  • 5. David Rakoff's last dance
  • 6. Irene Nemirovsky's raft in an ocean of leaves
  • 7. Michel de Montaigne's other half
  • 8. Sigmund Freud's last reading
  • 9. Christopher Hitchens's hospital library
  • 10. Margaret Wise Brown's final kick
  • 11. Heinrich von Kleist's joyous pact
  • 12. William James's goodbye to his father